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FV Newsletter

The Fountain Valley Communications Team has been created to keep the community informed and connected on various departments’ programs and services including upcoming events. The team decided to create a monthly Fountain Valley Newsletter to update residents on subject matter we believe is of importance to you. 
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Sep 30

National Fire Prevention Month

Posted on September 30, 2020 at 9:10 AM by Maggie Le

Open House 2020 revised
October is National Fire Prevention Month and October 4 – October 10. In past years, Fountain Valley Fire has hosted our Open House at Fire Station 1; however, due to COVID-19, we will be doing things a bit different. This year, our Open House will be a Drive-Thru event at Mile Square Park. The event will take place on Saturday, October 10 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. Enter the park at Brookhurst and Heil and follow the signs. Several fire apparatus will be on display to view as you drive along the path. Goodie bags for the kids will be available while supplies last.

This year, the theme for Fire Prevention Week is “Serve Up Fire Safety in the Kitchen”. Cooking is the #1 cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Unattended cooking is the leading cause of fires in the kitchen. Here are some facts and tips regarding cooking safety:

• Cooking is the leading cause of home fires and home fire injuries. Thanksgiving is the leading day for fires involving cooking equipment.

• The leading cause of fires in the kitchen is unattended cooking.

• Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, boiling, grilling, or broiling food.

• If you are simmering, baking, or roasting food, check it regularly and stay in the home.

• Always keep a lid nearby when cooking. If a small grease fire starts, slide the lid over the pan and turn off the burner. Leave the pan covered until it’s cool.

• Keep anything that can catch fire away from your stovetop.

• Loose clothing can hang down onto stove burners and catch fire. Wear short, close-fitting, or tightly rolled sleeves when cooking.

• Have a “kid-free zone” of at least 3 feet (1 meter) around the stove and areas where hot food or drink is prepared or carried.

In addition to the tips above, remember to have working smoke alarms. Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home, in every sleeping area, outside every sleeping area and in any hallways leading to sleeping areas. Also make sure your family has a home escape plan and that everyone in the home knows what to do when they hear the smoke alarm sound.

Since 1922, the NFPA has sponsored the public observance of Fire Prevention Week. In 1925, President Calvin Coolidge proclaimed Fire Prevention Week a national observance, making it the longest-running public health observance in our country. During Fire Prevention Week, children, adults, and teachers learn how to stay safe in case of a fire. Firefighters provide lifesaving public education in an effort to drastically decrease casualties caused by fires.

Fire Prevention Week is observed each year during the week of October 9th in commemoration of the Great Chicago Fire, which began on October 8, 1871, and caused devastating damage. This horrific conflagration killed more than 250 people, left 100,000 homeless, destroyed more than 17,400 structures, and burned more than 2,000 acres of land.

We hope to see you Saturday October 10! If you have any questions, please contact FV Fire Administration at 714-593-4436.

FPW20Timer